Author Topic: Experiences of Bavaria 390  (Read 501 times)

quakerfin

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Experiences of Bavaria 390
« on: March 31 2020, 11:00 »
Hello,

There is surprisingly less conversation about Bavaria sailboats from "era before mass-production". I mean 3-number models.. like Bavaria 390.

We are buying a "new" sail-training boat for the sea scouts. One possibility is Caribic -model with 4 cabins. Would be interesting to hear your own experiences about the model.

What are the pros and cons? It big, heavy... (is it?) but how does it sail? What are the main problems? :-) Thanks a lot for your answers!

Br. Mikko

Symphony

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Re: Experiences of Bavaria 390
« Reply #1 on: March 31 2020, 19:17 »
Welcome to the forum.

As you probably know the earlier models were built in much smaller numbers than the later J&J designs. The 390 was one of the last designs from Axel Mohnhaupt before the change to J&J. In some ways it was a sort of transition design between earlier heavier types being aimed (particularly the Caribic model you are looking at) at the growing charter market then dominated by French builders. If you look at the data on Sailboatdata for the different models you will find a lot of similarities to the later 40'designs. The main difference is in the ballast ratio, which is a little higher, partly because the draft is less and the keel shape different. At the time, Bavaria had a reputation similar to some of the Scandinavian builders and the internal finish and fittings were generally high quality with more of a "craftsman" feel than later production line built boats. The basic construction is robust and equipment comes from well known manufacturers such as Selden, Lewmar, Raymarine etc. Many boats were sold to charter operators, particularly in Greece and Croatia where they have an excellent reputation.

As with any 25+ year old boat, it is important to consider the current condition and past maintenance. The engine is worth close inspection as the 2003T originally fitted is not one of Volvo's best efforts.

Sounds like a good choice for your intended use, particularly for a large crew. I remember chartering a similar (later) 42 with 6 people and appreciated the space. The extra side cabin is very useful.

quakerfin

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Re: Experiences of Bavaria 390
« Reply #2 on: April 01 2020, 12:12 »
Welcome to the forum.

...

As with any 25+ year old boat, it is important to consider the current condition and past maintenance. The engine is worth close inspection as the 2003T originally fitted is not one of Volvo's best efforts.

Thanks!

Do you have any tips what to look when inspecting original Volvo Penta engine?

Symphony

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Re: Experiences of Bavaria 390
« Reply #3 on: April 01 2020, 12:32 »
The two main weaknesses are the turbo which can clog up with carbon deposits if run too much at light load and the aluminium oil cooler which is hidden low down on the side of the engine and is prone to corrosion and leaks. Very expensive to replace. They tend to be smoky, particularly on start up and when run on light loads, but should clear when warmer. Important to run when cruising under motor at speeds above 2400rpm when the turbo is working.

quakerfin

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Re: Experiences of Bavaria 390
« Reply #4 on: May 22 2020, 18:37 »
Great, thanks for helping!

So.. We decided to buy Bavaria 390 Caribic for finnish Sea Scout club called Käppäräpartio. You can follow our adventures across the Baltic Sea : @kapparapartio (instagram)

Ok, I have still few more questions!

1. We have two winches on the left side of entrance. (see attachment picture) Former owner didnt know what for is the smaller winch. Its not in the same (straight) line as the halyard stoppers and tgere are servo cleat afterwards. Any ideas?

Would be great to hear what would be ”factory settings” for ropes coming via halyard stoppers.

2. Our rig feels little loose. Is there some great instructions and help for proper righing? Thanks!

Symphony

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Re: Experiences of Bavaria 390
« Reply #5 on: May 22 2020, 20:03 »
Well done! Can't think what that extra winch is for.

There is no definitive factory layout for lines, but it is most common to have the reefing pennants on the port side with the mainsheet if it is coachroof mounted and the halyards, topping lift and kicker on the starboard side. This works if you have dedicated crew for each side - so one can handle the halyard and the other the reefing pennants when reducing sail without getting in eachother's way. If singlehanded you may want to arrange them differently.

Yngmar

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Re: Experiences of Bavaria 390
« Reply #6 on: May 22 2020, 23:04 »
Search for Seldén "Hints and Advice" PDF doc to learn how to tension the rig.

The winch there probably isn't original. Ask the PO if available or look around the rest of the cockpit for hints.
Sailing Songbird (Blog & YouTube)  ⛵️ Bavaria 40 Ocean (2001)

quakerfin

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Re: Experiences of Bavaria 390
« Reply #7 on: May 23 2020, 07:28 »
This winch is really original. All (at least almost all) Bav 390’s has it there on the port side of entrance. There must be some great idea after all..? :o

Thanks for tips, I will find out Selden’s instructions!

One another interesting thing is backstay + babystay. Both have adjustable tackle.

Should babystay be used only as a attachment point for hammock+stotm jib like PO told - or has it any real righing function?

How actively should backstay be adjusted? Once a summer or on every single sailing? I have understood that rig like Bav390 had it does not make real difference?

Symphony

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Re: Experiences of Bavaria 390
« Reply #8 on: May 23 2020, 09:01 »
Sounds like you have a detachable inner forestay for use of a storm jib. It does not have a babystay as part of the normal rigging. Normally that stay would be disconnected at the bottom and stowed against the mast as it makes tacking the genoa difficult. The 390 is fractional rigged and the adjustable backstay is used to control mast bend, most commonly to control the shape of the mainsail, particularly flattening it for higher winds. However, whether you want to use this depends very much on how you sail the boat. Those who want to squeeze the last bit of performance and have good sails that respond to this type of adjustment see it as a good tool, whereas others who are more relaxed about their sailing might not bother to adjust it at all. It is not essential for the basic tension of the rig as that is mostly controlled by upper and lower stays as you will discover when you follow the Selden procedures for tensioning the rig.