Author Topic: Cruising chute stemhead fitting  (Read 632 times)

MagicalArmchair

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Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« on: November 19 2019, 12:06 »
We have a wizard, brand new Kemp cruising chute, however, no stem head fitting to fly it from.





We won't be using it that much, with three kiddies on board, so I probably want to avoid a bowsprit affair if I can - what do others do? A loop of wire attached here perhaps? Is the anchor roller man enough to fly it from at the top of the below? Or will that just crash about?




sy_Anniina

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #1 on: November 19 2019, 12:33 »
If you are sometimes mooring bow-to, you may consider a fixed "bow platform" as an additional benefit. It makes boarding somewhat easier, especially now that I have a folding telescopic ladder mounted underneath the platform.


IslandAlchemy

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #2 on: November 19 2019, 13:56 »
I attach my tack block to the keyhole in the back end of the bow fitting.

MagicalArmchair

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #3 on: November 19 2019, 15:09 »
I attach my tack block to the keyhole in the back end of the bow fitting.

Is that this guy?



Do you just shackle the block right on there?

Thanks for the platform suggestion - I like the idea of that, however, that'll be a 2021 job :)

Symphony

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #4 on: November 19 2019, 15:43 »
The tack needs to be well forward of the forestay. Suggest you look at modifying the bow step and its support to fit a U bolt. I have done this, but it means cutting the strut from the crossbar and reforming the top of it so it provides a saddle under the bar through which the legs of the U bolt go. The strut is in two parts, one sliding in the other and will need welding up when it is set at the correct height.

As a temporary measure, though you can use a dyneema strop around the bow roller to take your tack block.

IslandAlchemy

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #5 on: November 19 2019, 18:19 »
I attach my tack block to the keyhole in the back end of the bow fitting.

Is that this guy?



Do you just shackle the block right on there?

Thanks for the platform suggestion - I like the idea of that, however, that'll be a 2021 job :)

Yes, there. Stick a shackle through it.  It doesn't need to be in front of the forestay, but you will need to snuff it when you want to gybe.

Symphony

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #6 on: November 20 2019, 10:32 »
That is the downside of using that mounting point and one of the reasons why it is better to attach the tack forward of the forestay, which also gets the chute in cleaner air. Well worth considering investing in a furler for ease of handling with a lighter crew. The handling gear is quite expensive but does encourage more frequent use of an already expensive sail!

Salty

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #7 on: November 20 2019, 19:36 »
We have a wizard, brand new Kemp cruising chute, however, no stem head fitting to fly it from.
We won't be using it that much, with three kiddies on board, so I probably want to avoid a bowsprit affair if I can - what do others do? A loop of wire attached here perhaps? Is the anchor roller man enough to fly it from at the top of the below? Or will that just crash about?


Have you considered using an ATN Tacker ?
If you are not familiar with what they are, type in ATN Tacker into your search engine and watch the video. It’s easy to use and I use one when sailing on my own.

IslandAlchemy

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #8 on: November 21 2019, 14:58 »
You can actually gybe the kite with it behind the forestay if you want to.  Just run the kite up inside the genoa sheets.

The head will not be perfect as it will be going over the top of the forestay after you gybe, but it still flies ok (unless you are racing of course).

sy_Anniina

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #9 on: November 22 2019, 07:18 »
If you are truly considering the bow platform for 2021, I would try to investigate if the front pin in anchor roller would tolerate the training loads (likely not heavy-weather usage) for the first year. The platform will have an anchor roller, so if you end up bending the exiting roller a bit, it won't be a total catastrophe.

1. Find sail load / force calculator online - cant't remember where, but I have seen some out there
2. Calculate tack line likely loads during your first season usage pattern
3. Pull the stemhead fitting with spinnaker halyard and force corresponding to point 2 above
4. some sideways jerking the halyard will show you if you are confident enough to try sailing with the foremost mounted tack-line

Love the bow platform myself, also makes it easier to moor to rocky islands in the non-tidal Baltic Sea


Yngmar

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #10 on: November 22 2019, 10:15 »
Just be aware that the Batsystem bow platform is not compatible with fitting a modern anchor with a roll bar. It'll probably work with the rollbar free Spade, Ultra or Vulcan models though. But even our neighbours old Delta hangs on them a bit crookedly, making for much less than a quarter turn around the windlass gypsy, which is problematic (chain can jump under load). Other than that I quite like the platforms, especially with the integrated bow ladder. Just make sure you register the boat length before adding the platform ;-)
Sailing Songbird (Blog & YouTube)  ⛵️ Bavaria 40 Ocean (2001)

Mirror45184

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #11 on: November 23 2019, 06:30 »
The Dynema loop/strop around the forestay tang is the best temporary solution.
For a permanent installation the Selden retractable bowsprit is the best way to go. Here it is on Synergy with the top down furler. I do a lot of single handed/short handed sailing and it is perfect for trouble free launching and retrieval of the Asymetric.

Cheers
Mark Hutton
SV SYnergy
B40 Cruiser 2009

sy_Anniina

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #12 on: November 25 2019, 07:40 »
Have to agree with Yngmar on both bow platform noncompatibility with roll-bars, as well as a bit crooked position with the CQR-copy we have (see previous photo).

Even though the chain does not wrap full 90 degrees on windlass gypsy, we have not had any problems so far (..touching wood..) and the chain has never jumped off. However we use the bow anchor only around 5 times per season, mostly in quite protected areas and always use a snubber line.


Laysula

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Re: Cruising chute stemhead fitting
« Reply #13 on: November 26 2019, 18:53 »
We have the same bow roller as you. We have a block fitted to the front bar of the pulpit under the step with a flat stainless steel clip. We have also secured the pulpit at the front to the pivot on the bow roller with a turnbuckle to stiffen everything up.